More women are taking up woodwork!

Women continue to wow the world in breaking stereotypes and crossing barriers, especially in formerly male-dominated industries, like woodwork.  The current trend opens more opportunities for females to venture in careers like furniture making, plumbing, interior, design, architecture, and the like. While it’s fortunate that today, it’s not surprising to see women take on such careers and hobbies, many women in woodwork had and still are having experiences that highlights the need for more transformation within the industry.

Many women woodworkers, especially those who have started decades ago, had very few female colleagues and acquaintances in their chosen career path. They became used to surprised comments and off-hand remarks, sometimes insinuating that they are on the wrong path. Yet their passion for the craft isn’t something that easily wanes, hence, their continued mission to learn more about woodwork and some with advocacy to help other women flourish in their woodworking paths.

A Woodworking Class for Women
A Woodworking Class for Women (Source: Bega District News)

Women are now more visible online, too, with blogs and websites belonging to women DIY-ers and woodworkers catching attention from all over the world. A few of them include Ana White, Leah Hudson-Smith, Patt Gregory, Danielle Thomas, and many others. With the validation they get, plus a whole lot of support from the worldwide woodworking community, they don’t just expand their skills set, but also their confidence. By seeing other women thrive in an environment where female workers are not easily found, entices more women to try it out or cultivate their desire to learn it as well.

Little by little, more women-friendly woodworking classes, like Patt Gregory’s Woodwork for Women, will be available to different communities, encouraging females to consider woodwork as a possible career path or hobby, too. Soon, there would no wrong notions of female running to hardware stores just to buy power tools and carpentry materials for their husbands or boyfriends. It could take more time, but we’re getting there.

Patt Gregory with her book; Woodwork for Women
Patt Gregory with her book; Woodwork for Women
(Source: Secrets of Self Sufficiency)

Let’s take inspiration from women woodworkers who have been able to successfully overcome the obstacles and shrugged of negative comments. Many of known and successful women in the field have encountered unpleasant experience or heard offensive remarks, yet they knew that pursuing woodwork is not about their gender but their passion. To get more inspiration from them, read their stories, know more about their experiences, and take from the lessons they have learned. Read Sawinery’s interview with four women woodworkers here: https://www.sawinery.net/blog/woodworking-women-interview/. Empower yourself by heeding their tips and knowing how they were able to successfully thrive in the woodworking industry.

Thanks to Earl Moore for this guest post

More Women Woodworkers